Science education

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This is the second part in a three part series on finding free scientific papers. You can read the first part here: Part I: A day in the life of an English physician Today, we do an experiment with PubMed and PubMed Central to determine the best way to search for free articles. The biggest problem that our doctor friend, from part I, faced, wasn ... Read more

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A few months ago, I wrote about a contest, sponsored by the Alliance for Science, in celebration of Darwin Day. High school students were asked to write an essay on the topic: "Why would you want your doctor to have studied evolution?" The winners have been announced and you can read their essays. Congratulations winners, teachers, and all participants! Read more

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NASA researchers are learning how to design video games and they're looking for high school students to help. They want students between the ages of 13-18 to play an online computer game about lunar geology and they want high school teachers to help recruit the students. What's in it for the students?
Players are guided through Selene by the director of the Center for Educational Technologies, Chuck Wood, an internationally known lunar geologist who writes a monthly column on the moon for Sky and Telescope and who is the ... Read more

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This three part series covers the problem of finding scientific articles, compares results from a few different methods, and presents instructions for the best method. A day in the life of an English physician In April, I had the great fortune to attend (and speak at) a conference on scientific publishing sponsored by the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers. One of the first speakers was an English physician who described his trials and a typical ordeal in trying to use the medical literature. ... Read more

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Quick synopsis: A type of grass grows in Yellowstone National Park in hot (65° C), unfriendly soil. How the plant manages this feat is a mystery. What we do know, is that the grass can only tolerate high temperatures if it's been infected by a fungus, and the fungus has to be infected by an RNA virus. In the paper describing this discovery, the researchers provided the GenBank accession numbers for the viral sequences. I decided to see if I could find out more about the proteins and what they do. Read ... Read more
Do you want to learn how to use some cool biotechnology and bioinformatics methods in your college or high school class? If you're on the East coast, the best place to go is the Fralin Biotechnology Conference at Virignia Tech, July 18-21st. (Yes, it's the same Virgina Tech, and that's why I waited to post this announcement). There's something for everyone at this conference. For beginners, there's a pre-conference Biotech Boot camp where you can learn to run gels and clone genes. For instructors with more ... Read more

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PZ's morning post about a bear killing a moose in someone's yard (they do live in Alaska, after all), reminded me that it's time to make an announcement about our upcoming course. No, no, no! We're not going to kill any moose on the premises. We're going to learn about the moose and its food, not the moose as its food. But, if you take the course that precedes ours, you might get to see some moose, and you might get to see some ... Read more
Science labs are not for all people. I've always enjoyed teaching lab courses, so some of you might find it strange that I agree with some of the comments from Steve Gimbel and fellow Sb'ers on the ... Read more
From NWABR:
Would you like to integrate ethics into your science classroom, but aren't sure which topics to address or teaching methods to use?
Do you feel that ethics is important to include in science education, but feel uncomfortable with your own lack of background knowledge?
Have you observed how students' motivation to learn content increases when science is discussed within its social and ethical context?
Come to the Ethics in the Science Classroom workshop and learn more! Who is this ... Read more
It must be spring. Summer course announcements are popping up everywhere and this site is no exception. Last Friday, I posted an announcement about our summer bioinformatics course in Alaska, June 27-29th. This week, I have a couple more conferences to announce. Naturally, I'll be at both of them, leading hands-on workshops for college and high school teachers in using the technology. Today, I want to tell you about the Bio-Link Summer Fellows Workshop, June 4th-8th Berkeley ... Read more

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